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dorf
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 5:18 pm

most anoying in subtitles

Tue Mar 24, 2009 1:36 pm

About subtitles is it neccessary to put all in it
example: huh, uh, Mmm-hmm, uh..., oh :shock:

And most anoying thing: <i> and </i>
gee.. these markings must be for retardet idiots. :evil:

hoodric
Subtitles Admin
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 12:35 pm

Tue Mar 24, 2009 7:55 pm

Yes, exactly. You've hit the nail on the head. Why would anyone in their right mind want such simple parts of speech written out for them in their subtitles?

Let us forget for a moment people who use subtitles because they are unable to hear what is being said. Surely these people must realise that when they see someone’s lips moving that it was simply one of those nonsensical noises that English speakers use as filler and not the utterance of an import plot point. For while they are unable to hear, surely they must understand such nuanced sounds which they have never heard. Why in the world would we want to help make the lives of those less “retarded” than yourself easier? Or the world of motion pictures that we all find so entertaining more accessible?

Of course all people watching a film in a language that is foreign to them must also realise the subtle sounds used by the original language of the film. Don’t we all know the localised versions of “huh, uh, Mmm-hmm, uh..., oh” in every language that may possibly appear in a film? Let us also ignore the fact that “huh, uh” and “oh” are actually words in certain languages.

As for the <i> … </i> in subtitles. I feel your pain. It must be hard being one of those “retarded” masses unable to set up their computer properly so that it can correctly decode the <start italics> like this <end italics> coding.

In fact, why not do away with subtitles all together?

Let us all stay within our own little boxes and only be exposed to the thoughts and ideas of those who are close to us, speaking and thinking the same as us, and ignore the diverse tapestry that is the world we live in.

(if anyone knows a language that uses “Mmm-hmm” please forgive my ignorance)

dorf
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 5:18 pm

Fri Mar 27, 2009 10:51 pm

That was english subtitles and english spoked movie, i donwload english subtitles becouse
there is no subtitles in that movie on my native language. That was not hearing-impaired subtiles.


<i> xxxxxxx </i> is commonly used when sound come speakers / phone or in "peoples thoughts".

only way to fix it, is editing subtitles. 8)

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shantimar
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Dec 06, 2009 7:50 am

Sun Dec 06, 2009 9:02 am

It's a luxury to have two sets of subtitles for each movie, one for hearing impaired and one for all the others. I've often watched movies marking things like "soft music", "laughter" etc... I don't complain, I'm thankful that some subtitles do exist and I can enjoy the movie.
If you find it unbearable, you can open the .srt in notepad and delete all those things, but then it will take longer than watching the movie, and also you will know the ending, so spoil your pleasure...

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eduo
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Wed Dec 09, 2009 2:30 am

Everything being said, though, if the subtitles contain notes about the music or non-verbal sounds then they ARE most definitively hearing-impaired subtitles.

A completely different discussion would be whether to use tags at all in subtitles. I don't like them, but would tolerate them if at least they were standard and non-intrusive.

For example, I wouldn't mind using signs for some specific things (like # for music # and * for electronic speakers * and [for narration of situational sounds]) since they don't appear in normal spoken text anyway and they're not very intrusive. I think HTML tags are the work of the devil, though. And should be banned (and electronically removed).

But I'm a bit of an extremists and I also believe credits should be removed from subtitles (and that's something coming from someone who's worked several years doing commercial subtitles and charging for them).

ixquic
Posts: 73
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2006 4:39 pm

Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:25 am

eduo, I don't understand why you would want to do away with the basic formatting options that SRT offers. (Of course SRT is not a standard with a spec, but all players I know support <i> and <b>.) Italics used right make subtitles better structured and less cluttered. Italics in subtitles are semantic, they're used to mark emphasis, foreign language expressions, book titles etc.. Experienced subtitle authors know when to use them. What I can't stand is when people remove them for no good reason. Until now I thought that happens because they don't know how to handle Subrip or some editing tool. It never crossed my mind that there could be an ideology behind it :)

Btw I prefer ♪ (U+266A) for songs.

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eduo
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Location: Information Technology
Contact: ICQ Website WLM Yahoo Messenger AOL

Mon Jan 11, 2010 10:37 am

ixquic wrote:eduo, I don't understand why you would want to do away with the basic formatting options that SRT offers. (Of course SRT is not a standard with a spec, but all players I know support <i> and <b>.) Italics used right make subtitles better structured and less cluttered. Italics in subtitles are semantic, they're used to mark emphasis, foreign language expressions, book titles etc.. Experienced subtitle authors know when to use them. What I can't stand is when people remove them for no good reason. Until now I thought that happens because they don't know how to handle Subrip or some editing tool. It never crossed my mind that there could be an ideology behind it :)

Btw I prefer ♪ (U+266A) for songs.


No. Not all players understand them. And no, not all people can choose the player they use (and shouldn't have to change because non-standard formatting options are inserted).

I'm all for using brackets for ambient sound and ## for music. That's it. No more than that since the SRT standard doesn't include them.

Sorry about this, I'm not flexible myself on the subject. I'll always clean up subtitles with this.

Also, until subtitles are standardized as unicode obviously no unicode character should be even considered.

yousaf465
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:33 am

Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:37 am

I think these kind of expressions should be included in the subtitles, otherwise what is the point of subtitles.

Xiggy
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 2:33 pm

Re: most anoying in subtitles

Sun Aug 29, 2010 6:07 pm

dorf wrote:About subtitles is it neccessary to put all in it
example: huh, uh, Mmm-hmm, uh..., oh :shock:

And most anoying thing: <i> and </i>
gee.. these markings must be for retardet idiots. :evil:




shantimar wrote:It's a luxury to have two sets of subtitles for each movie, one for hearing impaired and one for all the others. I've often watched movies marking things like "soft music", "laughter" etc... I don't complain, I'm thankful that some subtitles do exist and I can enjoy the movie.
If you find it unbearable, you can open the .srt in notepad and delete all those things, but then it will take longer than watching the movie, and also you will know the ending, so spoil your pleasure...



In any text editor more capable than Notepad, (even Word, if you're careful to save as plain text) you can delete HTML tags, or text after [] in a few seconds with a search and replace. You don't have to read it at all.

I always do at least a spellcheck and tidy up punctuation automatically before I use a subtitle anyway.


hoodric wrote:As for the <i> … </i> in subtitles. I feel your pain. It must be hard being one of those “retarded” masses unable to set up their computer properly so that it can correctly decode the <start italics> like this <end italics> coding.


Actually, HTML markup is not part of the SRT definition, and many subtitle tools will not deal with them except to display the raw code.
Notably when I make DVDs, GuiForDVDAuthor will not. I either strip them out as above, or if I think they're relevant, I make SUP subtitles using Subtitle Creator (which does honour italic tags) and use that.

Usually though it's rather an affectation. Subtitles supplement the actors' spoken words, not replace them (unless of course they're for the deaf). You can hear the emphasis, and know when something is, say, a voiceover. All I need is the translation.


ixquic wrote:eduo, I don't understand why you would want to do away with the basic formatting options that SRT offers

Because SRT does not offer this. It's an informal extension.

But I worry more about the correctness of the words. I can and usually do routinely fix the formatting and timing.

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